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Managing Grief on Valentine's Day:
10 Soothing Activities

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As the calendar pages turn to February, as pink and red hearts cover the store shelves, many people are experiencing both love and grief on Valentine’s Day. While the pain might not always be at the forefront, specific occasions, like Valentine’s Day, can bring forth a surge of emotions. Despite the challenges, there are gentle, loving ways to navigate grief on Valentine’s Day.

Anticipating Grief on Valentine's Day

Grief sometimes catches us off guard, while other times we can plan for it. Valentine’s Day, with its inherent emphasis on love and togetherness, can magnify the sense of loss and longing. Acknowledging that this may amplify grief can allow us to prepare ahead of time, adding in buffers and support to see us through.  Anticipating how grief might manifest allows us to prepare, crafting a plan that embraces our emotions while offering solace and comfort.

Nurture Love & Grief on Valentine's Day

Here are some simple, heartfelt ways you can keep your loved one’s memory alive and turn your sadness into a loving tribute on this day.

Sharing a Favorite Meal

Celebrate your loved one by enjoying a meal they loved. Whether you go out to their favorite spot or cook their top dish at home, eating what they enjoyed is a special way to remember them. It’s like having them there with you, sharing the meal.

Watching Their Favorite Movie

Snuggle up and watch a movie they couldn’t get enough of. It’s a cozy way to feel close to them again. The familiar scenes and lines might bring back happy memories and warm your heart.

Planting in Their Memory

Planting something in their name is a beautiful way to keep their memory alive. A tree or a flower that grows over time can be a living reminder of your love for them. Every new bud or leaf can feel like a gentle nod from your loved one.

Visiting Special Places

Going to places that were significant in your journey together can be a heartfelt way to remember your loved one. Each place holds stories and memories, making your connection to them feel even more alive.

Finding Strength in Community

Surround yourself with people who understand and support you. There’s strength in being with others who share your feelings of loss and can offer comfort and understanding.

Lighting a Candle

Lighting a candle quietly can be a powerful way to remember your loved one. The steady flame can feel like their spirit is still lighting up your life, offering comfort and warmth.

Writing It Out

Writing a letter to your loved one can be a private way to feel close to them. It’s a space where you can say all the things you wish you could tell them, keeping the connection between you strong.

managing grief on Valentine's Day 2

Self-Love & Soothing

Remember to be kind to yourself, especially on tough days like Valentine’s Day. Buying yourself flowers, some chocolate, or just taking a moment to reflect can be an act of love for yourself as you navigate your grief.

Giving in Their Memory

Sometimes, helping others can be a way to heal our own hearts. Consider making a donation or a thoughtful gesture in memory of your loved one. It’s a way to spread the love they left you with, touching others’ lives and turning your loss into a positive impact.

Sharing Stories with Others

Get together with friends or family who also miss your loved one. Sharing stories and memories can turn a meal into a special occasion where laughter and tears are both welcome. It’s a way to keep the bond you all share with your loved one alive and strong.

Final Thoughts

Even though Valentine’s Day can be hard when you’re grieving, it can also be a meaningful time to remember the love that will always be part of you. These simple acts and traditions can help you honor your loved one and keep their memory alive in your heart.

If you’re struggling or need help managing grief, reach out to us and learn about how our grief counselors can help you heal. 

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of course! though we have some unconventional therapy approaches, we are rooted in evidenced based practices. Talk therapy is a major player in the therapy room! See What we Treat and Integrative Services for more information

Is Online Therapy As Effective As In-Person Therapy?

Online therapy is essentially face-to-face counseling, just conducted remotely. Studies show that teletherapy is as effective as traditional counseling. Professional organizations and state governments recognize its benefits and have set regulations for it. However, like any therapy, its success in achieving your goals isn’t guaranteed. It’s important to discuss with your therapist whether teletherapy is working for you.

Can I Change Therapists If I'm Not Happy?

Yes, you can switch therapists to another provider within the practice, or we can provide you a referral if preferred. We want to ensure that your time and effort are well spent, and that you are getting the relief you need, that’s why we work collaboratively with each other in the practice, as well as outside therapists who we know and trust.

How Do I Know If Therapy Is Helping?

You should feel like you’re making progress. Signs it’s working include:

Feeling comfortable talking to your therapist
Your therapist respects boundaries
You’re moving towards your goals
You feel listened to
You’re doing better in life
Your self-esteem is getting better

Is Online Therapy Easy to Use for Non-Tech-Savvy People?

Yes, it’s pretty simple to access sessions. You’ll need basic internet skills, such as opening and visiting the patient link sent to you via email. It’s similar to video chatting like Facetime or Zoom. We can also walk you through it on the phone the first time to ensure a strong connection

What Questions Should I Ask My New Therapist?

Feel free to ask anything. Some good questions are:

  • How often will we meet?
  • What do you specialize in?
  • What experience do you have with my issue?
  • What outcomes can I expect?
  • How will I know I’m progressing?
  • How long do you usually work with clients?
  • How will we set my treatment goals?

How Should I Prepare for My First Session?

Showing up is all that you need to do! But if you really want to get the most out of session, it could help to take some time to think about what you want from therapy. It helps to write down your goals, questions you have or things that you feel are important to share. 

What is the difference between associate therapists & fully licensed therapists?

Our Qualifications:

Our founder, Rebecca Sidoti, is a highly qualified, state-licensed therapist and supervisor with extensive training in anxiety related disorders and innovative treatment such as Ketamine Therapy. Mind by Design Counseling adheres to standards set by the our governing counseling boards.

To see each providers credentials, training and licenses, visit our “Meet the Therapists” Page to learn more.

 

  • LAC/LSW are therapists who may practice clinical work under the supervision of a fully licensed therapist.
  • LPC/LCSW are therapists who have completed the necessary clinical hours post-graduation under supervision and can practice clinical work independently.

What Geographic Areas Are Served?

Currently, we serve clients in New Jersey and are expanding to other states as telehealth laws evolve. While telehealth offers the convenience of attending sessions from anywhere, state laws require clients to be in-state during their session.

Is Virtual Counseling Suitable for Everyone?

Online therapy might not be as effective for individuals with chronic suicidal thoughts, severe trauma, significant mental health history, or those recently in intensive care. Such cases often benefit more from traditional, in-person counseling. We’ll help you decide if our online services are right for you during your intake and evaluation.

What Equipment is Needed for Online Therapy?

To join a session, log in using the credentials we provide. No downloads are needed. Our platform, compatible with both individual and group sessions, requires:
A computer or mobile device with a webcam and internet access.
We’ll help you test your setup before your first appointment to ensure a reliable connection. iOS users should use the Safari browser for mobile and tablet sessions.

What Questions Will Therapists Ask Me?

It depends on your goals. Expect questions about your thoughts, feelings, relationships, work, school, and health. They’ll ask to understand your therapy goals.

How Do You Keep Client Information Secure?

Security and Confidentiality of Sessions:
Your privacy is crucial to us. We use TherapyNotes, a HIPAA-compliant platform, ensuring secure and confidential teletherapy sessions. This platform’s security features include encrypted video connections, secure data transfers, and encrypted databases, ensuring your information is safe at all times.

What is VRT used for?

we use VRT to support Exposure Therapy, a long standing traditional therapy modality to treat phobias, anxiety and stress. we send a headset directly to your home so you can access VRT from anywhere.

VRT not only helps with exposure therapy for phobias, but is great for ADHD, mindfulness, PTSD and social anxiety.

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